Solata Foods LLC. of Newburgh, NY, is recalling its “Fresh Spinach” listed below because they may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy persons may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, L. monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled “Fresh Spinach” was distributed locally in retail stores. The product comes in various sizes listed below with all brand names, All packages have lot numbers # 40606 and 11006 on the package and with an expiration date of 6/20/24 and 6/24/24 stamped on the side. The product UPC codes are listed below.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

The contamination was discovered after sampling by New York State Department of Agriculture and Market Food Inspectors and subsequent analysis by Food Laboratory personnel revealed the presence of L. monocytogenes in a 9-ounce package of Bogopa “Fresh Spinach.” Production of the product has been suspended

New York officials are warning consumers about contaminated raw milk from Big Brook Farm in Lee Center.

In a warning issued by the State Agriculture and Markets Commissioner the public is advised to stop consuming unpasteurized raw milk from the dairy. The caution is a result of potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

“On March 13, 2024, the producer was notified of a preliminary positive test result. Further laboratory testing, completed on March 18, 2024, confirmed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in the raw milk sample,” a release from the agriculture department stated. 

The farm is prohibited from selling raw milk until new testing shows that the product is free of harmful bacteria.

The commissioner said that if you bought the raw milk from there to throw it out and call the farm at 315-266-7254.

Big Brook Farm is located at 6063 Weaver Road in Lee Center. 

Sigmon Dairy of Rochester, WA, is recalling retail raw whole milk with Best By dates March 4 through March 12 because it may be contaminated with Listeria Monocytogenes. 

The recall was initiated after routine sampling conducted by the Washington State Department of Agriculture revealed the presence of Listeria in retail raw milk dated March 4, according to an announcement from the dairy.

The unpasteurized recalled product was bottled in half-gallon and gallon containers and was sold via retail stores in Rochester and Chehalis, WA, as well as on-farm sales. Sigmon Dairy and the state agriculture department continue to work jointly to address the source of the problem. 

Consumers who have purchased Sigmon Dairy retail raw whole milk with Best By dates of March 4 through March 12 are urged not to drink the product and return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 360- 529-7356. 

Retail raw milk is legal to sell and buy in Washington State, but the potential health risks are serious, according to the state department of agriculture. Consumers should read the warning label on the retail raw milk container carefully and ask their retailer to verify the milk was produced and processed by a WSDA-licensed operation. 

The CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated a multistate outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections. Epidemiologic and laboratory data showed that HMC Farms peaches, nectarines, and plums might be contaminated with Listeria and made people sick.

A total of 11 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria were reported from seven states – California 3, Colorado 1, Florida 3, Illinois 1, Kansas 1, Michigan 1 and Ohio 1. Sick people’s samples were collected from August 22, 2018, to August 16, 2023. Of 10 people with information available, all were hospitalized. One person got sick during their pregnancy and had preterm labor. One death was reported from California.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the month before they got sick. Of the seven people interviewed, all (100%) reported eating peaches, nectarines, or plums. CDC conducted a case-case analysis, comparing foods reported by people in this outbreak to foods reported by people who got sick with Listeria but were not part of an outbreak. The analysis showed that people in this outbreak were 18 times more likely to eat peaches, nectarines, or plums (p<0.001) than sick people not in this outbreak. This suggested that peaches, nectarines, and plums were a likely source of this outbreak.

Public health investigators used the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that might be part of this outbreak. CDC PulseNet manages a national database of DNA fingerprints of bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. DNA fingerprinting is performed on bacteria using a method called whole genome sequencing (WGS). WGS showed that bacteria from sick people’s samples were closely related genetically. This suggested that people in this outbreak got sick from the same food.

On October 23, 2023, FDA collected a sample of HMC Farms peaches for testing and found Listeria in it. On November 6, 2023, WGS showed that the Listeria in the peaches were closely related to bacteria from sick people. This means that people likely got sick from eating those peaches. On November 17, 2023, HMC Farms recalled whole peaches, plums, and nectarines sold in stores between May 1 and November 15 in 2022 and 2023.

Listeria:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Listeriaoutbreaks. The Listeria lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $850 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Listeria lawyers have litigated Listeria cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as lettuce, polony, deli meat, cantaloupe, cheese, celery and milk.  

If you or a family member became ill with a Listeria infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Listeria attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Additional Resources:

What is Listeria?

Listeria is a bacterium that causes a serious infection called listeriosis. Around 300 deaths in the United States are caused by Listeria infection each year, according to estimates from a 2011 CDC report. 

Listeria bacteria are most found in raw foods. Vegetables can be contaminated by soil and water carrying bacteria. Listeria is also found in raw animal products, such as meat and cheese. 

Babies can be born with Listeria if the mother eats contaminated food during pregnancy. The death rate among newborns with Listeria is 25 to 50 percent. 

Who is most likely to get seriously ill from Listeria bacteria?

Healthy adults and children hardly ever become seriously ill from Listeria. However, people at increased risk of illness from Listeria bacteria include:

  • Pregnant women – Pregnant women are 20 times more likely to get listeriosis than the average healthy adult
  • Newborns
  • People with weak immune systems
  • People with cancer, diabetes, or kidney disease
  • People with AIDS – People with AIDS are 300 times more likely to get sick from Listeria than people with normal immune systems
  • People who take gluticocorticosteroids, such as cortisone
  • Elderly people

Symptoms of Listeria

Listeria symptoms appear anywhere between 3 and 70 days after infection, but usually around 21 days later. Typical symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Muscle aches
  • Nausea or diarrhea (less common)

If infection spreads to the central nervous system, symptoms can include:

  • Headache
  • Stiff neck
  • Confusion
  • Loss of balance
  • Convulsions

Symptoms for those with Weakened Immune Systems

If a patient has a weak immune system, Listeria bacteria can invade the central nervous system and cause meningitis or a brain infection. 

Symptoms for Pregnant Women and Newborns

Infected pregnant woman experience mild, flu-like symptoms. However, infection during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, infection of the newborn, or stillbirth. Symptoms usually appear in newborns in the first week of life but can also occur later on. A newborn’s Listeria symptoms are often subtle, and include irritability, fever, and poor feeding.

Diagnosis of Listeria

Doctors can determine whether patients have listeriosis by taking a blood or spinal fluid sample.

Treatment of Listeria

Patients who present with symptoms of listeriosis can be treated with antibiotics.

How to Prevent Listeria

  • Thoroughly cook raw food from animal sources, such as beef, pork, or poultry
  • Wash raw vegetables before eating them
  • Keep uncooked meats separate from vegetables and cooked foods 
  • Avoid products made with unpasteurized milk
  • Wash hands and cooking utensils after handling uncooked foods
  • Consume perishable and read-to-eat foods as soon as possible

Foods to Avoid

  • Do not eat hot dogs or lunch meats unless they are heated to a temperature sufficient to kill Listeria bacteria
  • Avoid getting liquid from hot dog packages on other food
  • Wash hands after handling hot dogs and lunch and deli meats
  • Do not eat soft cheeses (e.g., feta, Brie, Camembert, blue cheese, and queso blanco) unless the label clearly states that they are pasteurized
  • Do not eat refrigerated pâté or meat spread, only canned or shelf-stable ones
  • Do not eat refrigerated smoked seafood, sometimes labeled as “nova-style,” “lox,” “kippered,” or “jerky.” Canned or shelf-stable smoked seafood is ok

Additional Resources:

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Listeria outbreaks. The Listeria lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $850 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Listeria lawyers have litigated Listeria cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as lettuce, polony, deli meat, cantaloupe, cheese, celery and milk.  

If you or a family member became ill with a Listeria infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Listeria attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Nam & Son of MD, Jessup, MD is recalling one-pound bags of soybean sprouts, with the sell-by date of December 21, 2023, because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail, or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headaches, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeriainfections can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The product has been distributed to retail stores in MD ranging from December 14, 2023.

The affected product is packaged in a 1lb plastic bag (retail), labeled under the Nam & Son of MD DBA Sam Sung S & M Food and have a “Sell By” date of December 21, 2023.

NO illness has been reported to date.

The recall was initiated after a random sample was collected and analyzed by the state of Maryland, which resulted in confirmation of presence Listeria Monocytogenes in the product. The company has actively started investigating the root cause of the problem. All retail stores who have this “Sell By” date on the packaging should remove this product from their shelves. Consumers should not consume the products and should discard this product or return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers should contact their health provider with any illness concerns. Consumers with questions about the warning may contact Nam & Son at 443-896-6738 which will be monitored 24 hours EST from Monday – Sunday.

Link to First Recall

sonoco_moxie_spinach_mockup_nongmo

BrightFarms has issued a voluntary recall of spinach grown by its supplier Element Farms in their Pompton Plains, New Jersey farm and distributed under the BrightFarms brand because the spinach has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Due to potential cross-contamination, BrightFarms is also issuing a voluntary recall of a limited quantity of four salad kit products (shown below) from its Selinsgrove, PA facility.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriage and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled products were distributed to retailers in seven states including Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.

The products come in 4-oz, clear, plastic containers. Information about the “best by” date, UPC, and facility code can be found at the bottom of the package. Pictures to assist customers in identifying the recalled products are found at the end of this announcement.

ProductOunceUPC
Codes
Facility
Code
Best-By Date
BrightFarms Baby Spinach3.5oz8-57062-00492-3PEN81/11/2024,
1/13/2024,
1/18/2024,
1/20/2024
BrightFarms Mediterranean
Crunch Kit
6.35oz8-50051-82501-1PEN41/15/2024,
1/20/2024
BrightFarms Chickpea Caesar
Crunch Kit
6.50oz8-57062-00415-2PEN41/15/2024,
1/20/2024
BrightFarms Bacon Ranch
Crunch Kit
6.70oz8-57062-00416-9PEN41/15/2024
BrightFarms Southwest
Chipotle
5.85oz8-50051-82500-4PEN41/15/2024

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall of spinach was initiated after routine sampling conducted by Element Farms yielded a positive result for Listeria monocytogenes. Due to potential cross-contamination at BrightFarms’s Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania facility, BrightFarms is also recalling a limited quantity of four select salad kit products. No positive test results or reported illness have been received on those products, to date.

As a result of today’s recall, the company has temporarily suspended distribution of Element Farms grown spinach.

Fresh Express has issued a voluntary recall of a Fresh Express Spinach, 8 oz. size, with product code G332 and use-by date of December 15 and Publix Spinach, 9 oz size, with product code G332 and a now expired use-by date of December 14 due to a potential health risk from Listeria monocytogenesListeria monocytogenes can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women. Consumers with these symptoms of listeriosis should consult their health care provider.

The two recalled spinach items were distributed to retailers in seven states including AL, FL, GA, NC, SC, TN and VA.

Fresh Express Limited Product Recall December 15, 2023

Name of ProductOuncesUPCBag CodeUse-By DateDistribution States
Fresh Express Spinach8 oz.0 71279 13204 4G332Dec 15, 2023AL, FL, GA, NC, VA
Publix Spinach9 oz.0 41415 00886 1G332Dec 14, 2023AL, FL, GA, NC, SC, TN, VA

Product codes are located on the front of the packages below the use-by dates. Photos are provided for ease of identifying the products.

To date no illnesses are reported in connection with the recall and no other Fresh Express products are being recalled.

The recall was initiated after routine sampling conducted by the Florida Department of Agriculture yielded a positive result for Listeria monocytogenes in a single randomly selected package of spinach. Fresh Express immediately notified affected retailers and instructed them to remove the recalled items from store shelves and all inventories.

Herold’s Salads of Cleveland is recalling assorted deli salads packaged in various sizes. Recalled products may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

There have been no reported illnesses or adverse health effects reported to date, however, Herolds Salads Inc. is proactively recalling specific batches to which this risk applies. The following products should be disposed of immediately (label examples are included):

  • Southern Potato Salad Best Before: 1/14/2024-1/16/2024
  • Original Potato Salad Best Before: 1/14/2024-1/16/2024
  • Original Potato Salad with Egg Best Before: 1/14/2024-1/16/2024
  • Rotini Garden Medley Best Before: 1/14/2024-1/16/2024
  • Greek Orzo Best Before: 1/14/2024
  • Black Bean and Corn Salsa Best Before: 01/14/2024
  • Fireland Deli Potato Salad Best Before: 01/26/2024
  • Amish Macaroni Salad Best Before: 01/17/2024
  • Amish Potato Salad Best Before: 01/17/2024
  • Original Macaroni Salad Best Before: 01/14/2024-1/16/2024
  • Poppyseed Pasta Salad Best Before: 1/6/2024
  • Amish Wedding Rotini Garden Medley Best Before: 01/14/2024
  • Amish Wedding Potato Salad Best Before: 1/24/2024
  • Amish Wedding Macaroni Salad Best Before: 1/19/2024
  • Amish Wedding Diced Cucumber Salad Best Before: 01/23/2024
  • Amish Macaroni Salad (Dutch Valley) Best Before: 1/19/2024
  • Amish Potato Salad (Dutch Valley) Best Before: 1/19/2024

Product may have been repackaged in a variety of sizes pending on the location of purchase. Please ask your local point of purchase if the product purchased falls within this recall.

Products were available at the following locations in Ohio:

  • Lake Road Market, 20267 Lake Rd., Rocky River
  • Krieger’s Ranch Market, 615 Graham Road, Cuyahoga Falls
  • Shop N Save, 37 Ridge Rd, Newton Falls
  • Tost, 13427 Madison Ave, Lakewood
  • Tost, 2341 Scranton Rd, Cleveland
  • Chuppa’s Market Place, 5640 Pearl Road, Parma
  • Mike’s Market, 9189 Chillicothe Rd, Kirtland
  • Rego’s, 19600 W 130th St, Strongsville
  • Dave’s Market, 1929 E. 61st Street, Cleveland
  • Dave’s Market, 871 E. Exchange St., Akron
  • Dave’s Market, 4948 Turney Rd., Garfield Heights
  • Dave’s Market, 22501 Shore Center Dr., Euclid
  • Dave’s Market, 16820 Harvard Ave., Cleveland
  • Dave’s Market, 3628 Mayfield Rd., Cleveland Heights
  • Dave’s Market, 5100 Wilson Mills Rd., Richmond Heights
  • Dave’s Market, 3565 Ridge Road, Cleveland
  • Farmhouse Foods, 20524 Southgate Park Blvd., Bedford
  • Bums, 7771 Broadway Ave., Cleveland
  • Verdi’s Italian Market, 8720 Mentor Ave., Mentor
  • Postiy’s Meats, 3819 Columbus Rd., Canton
  • Pressler Meats, 2553 Pressler Rd., Akron
  • Macali’s Giant Eagle, 48 Vienna Ave., Niles
  • Edinburgh Corner Store, 6792 Tallmadge Rd., Rootstown
  • Brownhelm Country Market, 1605 North Ridge Rd., Vermilion
  • Steve Polansky Meats, 6703 Dewey Rd., Amherst
  • Augie’s Pizza, 14084 State Rd., North Royalton
  • Vermillion Market, 2901 Liberty Ave., Vermillion
  • Lucky’s Market, 7596 Fredle Dr., Concord
  • Raddell’s Sausage, 478 E. 152nd St., Cleaveland
  • Mentor Family Foods, 7294 Lakeshore Blvd., Mentor
  • Rego Brother’s Market, 19600 W. 130th St., Strongsville
  • Miller’s Grocery, 711 Wooster St., Lodi
  • Miller’s Grocery, 1617 Claremont Ave., Ashland
  • IGA, 220 N. Main St., Rittman
  • Heffelfinger Meats, 469 County Road 30A, Jeromesville
  • Albert’s, 460 Main St., Grafton
  • Fresh Deli, 5 East Caston Rd., Akron
  • Roots Poultry, 3721 W. State St., Fremont
  • Herolds Salads Inc, 17512 Miles Ave., Cleveland

Listeria Monocytogenes is commonly known for causing fever, muscle aches, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea and may also lead to stillbirth in severe cases. Persons exhibiting any of these symptoms should seek medical attention immediately.

The recalled peaches have been linked to an outbreak of Listeriosis that has resulted in eleven illnesses.

FDA, CDC and State Health Departments have yet to weigh in.

See all Photos

The HMC Group Marketing, Inc., which does business as HMC Farms, is voluntarily recalling peaches, plums and nectarines sold in retail stores between May 1 and November 15, 2022 and between May 1 and November 15, 2023. The fruit is being recalled because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled fruit was distributed nationwide and sold at retail stores as individual pieces of fruit bearing PLU stickers (see photos) or in consumer packaging (also shown in the attached photos) AND sold at retail between May 1 and November 15, 2022 and between May 1 and November 15, 2023.

This recall includes only conventionally grown fruit – no organic fruit is being recalled. Peaches, plums, and nectarines currently available for sale at retail stores are not included in this recall.