MG Foods of Charlotte, NC is recalling various Turkey Sandwiches due to a potential contamination of Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, a Listeria monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The products were distributed between March 3, 2021 and March 5, 2021 and packaged in clear plastic wedges & paper bags. The products were sold at distributors located at the Charlotte Douglas Airport and via vending machines and micro markets located in business locations in Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and West Virginia. The company reacted swiftly and as of end-of-day March 5, 2021 affected products were removed from sale at all locations.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

On March 2, 2021 during routine environmental testing the company detected the presence of Listeria on surface areas where the recalled products were produced. Out of an abundance of caution, MG Foods is recalling the products due to the potential that some product may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Products recalled at the Charlotte Douglas Airport are:

PRODUCT SIZE UPC CONTAINER USE BY DATES
MG Foods Combo Half & Half 6.82 oz 1 00000 50069 9 Plastic Wedge 3/9/2021
MG Foods Turkey & Cheddar BLT 6.9 oz 1 00000 50068 2 Plastic Wedge 3/7/2021
MG Foods Turkey & Swiss Croissant 7.5 oz 1 00000 50011 8 Brown Bag 3/7/2021

Products recalled in vending machines and micro markets located in Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and West Virginia are:

PRODUCT SIZE UPC CONTAINER USE BY DATES
Fresh to You Club on Toast 10.3 oz MGF0930 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Club Panini 8.50 oz MGF9844 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Club Sub 9.14 oz C0932 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Club Sub 9.14 oz MGF9100 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Deluxe Triple Decker Club 12.17 oz MGF9719 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Ham & Turkey Combo 5.85 oz MGF3054 Plastic Wedge 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Ham & Turkey Combo on 12 Grain 7.20 oz MGF6011 Plastic Wedge 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Jumbo Turkey & Cheese Sub 6.74 oz MGF1002 Plastic Wrap 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Market Club 11.85 oz MGF9800 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Market Ham & Turkey Combo 5.85 oz MGF23054 Plastic Wrap 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Market Shaved Turkey & Cheese 4.55 oz MGF25571 Plastic Wedge 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Shaved Turkey & Cheese 4.55 oz MGF5571 Plastic Wedge 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Turkey & Baby Swiss on a Honey Brown Roll 9.42 oz MGF9703 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Turkey & Cheddar Club 10.02 oz MGF9710 Plastic Wedge 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Turkey & Cheese Cut 6.56 oz MGF0596 Plastic Wedge 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Turkey & Cheese Hoagie 6.35 oz MGF0597 Plastic Wrap 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Turkey & Sun-Dried Tomato Aioli on Pita 8.29 oz MGF9806 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Turkey & Swiss on a Kaiser Roll 8.1 oz MGF9712 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Turkey & Swiss on a Wheat Roll 5.22 oz MGF0854 Plastic Wrap 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Turkey & Swiss on Whole Wheat 3.9 oz MGF0283 Plastic Wedge 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Turkey Club Croissant 7.94 oz MGF9103 Plastic Square 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Turkey Cranberry Pita 9.0 oz MGF9804 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
Fresh to You Turkey Melt Croissant 6.7 oz MGF3032 Plastic Wrap 3/9/2021
Fresh to You Tuscan Turkey Ciabatta 9.18 oz MGF9810 Plastic Wrap 3/7/2021
MG Foods Combo Half & Half 6.82 oz 1 00000 50069 9 Plastic Wedge 3/9/2021
MG Foods The Club Sub 8.5 oz 1 00000 50002 6 Brown Bag 3/9/2021
MG Foods Turkey & Cheddar BLT 6.9 oz 1 00000 50068 2 Plastic Wedge 3/7/2021
MG Foods Turkey & Pepperjack Sub 7.9 oz 1 00000 50055 2 Brown Bag 3/7/2021
MG Foods Turkey & Provolone BLT 8.1 oz 1 00000 50065 1 Plastic Wedge 3/7/2021
MG Foods Turkey & Provolone on 12 Grain 8.9 oz 1 00000 50066 8 Plastic Wedge 3/7/2021
MG Foods Turkey & Swiss Croissant 7.5 oz 1 00000 50011 8 Brown Bag 3/7/2021

 

Epidemiologic and laboratory data show that queso fresco cheeses made by El Abuelito Cheese Inc. are contaminated with Listeria and have made people sick.

Since the last update on February 19, three more illnesses have been reported. As of February 23, a total of 10 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes have been reported from four states – New York, Connecticut, Maryland and Virginia. Illnesses started on dates ranging from October 20, 2020, to February 9, 2021, with nine recent illnesses in 2021.

Sick people range in age from <1 to 75 years, with a median age of 54. Nine people are Hispanic, and six people are female. Two illnesses are pregnancy-associated. Out of nine people with information available, all have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because some people recover without medical care and are not tested for Listeria. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 2 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Investigators are concerned that additional El Abuelito brand cheeses made or handled in the same facility as the queso fresco may be contaminated with Listeria. CDC and FDA are expanding our advice to recommend people not eat, sell, or serve any cheeses sold under the brand name of El Abuelito, in addition to the recalled queso fresco cheeses.

As of February 11, 2021, seven people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes have been reported from four states – Connecticut, Maryland, New York and Virginia. Illnesses started on dates ranging from October 20, 2020, to January 22, 2021, with six recent illnesses in 2021.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because some people recover without medical care and are not tested for Listeria. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 2 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Sick people range in age from 45 to 75 years, with a median age of 61. Six people are Hispanic, and 43% are female. All seven people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

State and local public health officials are interviewing people about the foods they ate in the month before they got sick. Of the four people interviewed, three reported eating at least one type of Hispanic-style fresh and soft cheeses and all three reported eating queso fresco. Public health officials are continuing to interview sick people to try to identify a specific type or brand of cheese.

Public health investigators are using the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that may be part of this outbreak. CDC PulseNet manages a national database of DNA fingerprints of bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. DNA fingerprinting is performed on bacteria using a method called whole genome sequencing (WGS).

WGS showed that bacteria from sick people’s samples are closely related genetically. This means that people in this outbreak likely got sick from the same food.

State officials are testing samples of Hispanic-style fresh and soft cheeses that they collected from stores where sick people report purchasing cheeses from.

As of January 26, 2021, a total of 12 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes were reported from four states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Map of Reported Cases page.

Listeria samples from ill people were collected from August 6, 2020, to October 30, 2020. Ill people ranged in age from 40 to 89 years, with a median age of 81 years, and 83% were female. All 12 people were hospitalized, and one death was reported from Florida.

Epidemiologic evidence showed that deli meat was the likely source of this outbreak.

State and local public health officials interviewed ill people about the foods they ate in the month before they became ill. Of the 11 people interviewed, all reported eating Italian-style deli meats, such as salami, mortadella, and prosciutto. They reported purchasing prepackaged deli meats and meats sliced at deli counters at various locations.

USDA-FSIS and state officials reviewed records collected from stores where ill people purchased deli meats to find a common supplier of deli meats. They also tested deli meat products that ill people reported eating. However, they did not find a common supplier or a specific type of deli meat as the source of this outbreak.

 

Listeria – Deli Meat

As of November 30, 2020, a total of 11 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes have been reported from three states.

Listeria samples from ill people were collected from August 6, 2020, to October 30, 2020. Ill people range in age from 40 to 89 years, with a median age of 84 years, and 82% are female. All 11 ill people were hospitalized. One death has been reported from Florida.

Epidemiologic evidence shows that deli meat is a likely source of this outbreak.

State and local public health officials interviewed ill people about the foods they ate in the month before they became ill. Of the 10 people interviewed, all reported eating Italian-style deli meats, such as salami, mortadella, and prosciutto. They reported purchasing prepackaged deli meats and meats sliced at deli counters at various locations.

Investigators are working to identify a specific type of deli meat or a common supplier linked to the illnesses.

Listeria – Enoki Mushrooms

A total of 36 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes were reported from 17 states.

Listeria specimens from ill people were collected from November 23, 2016, to December 13, 2019. Ill people ranged in age from less than 1 to 96 years, with a median age of 67. Fifty-eight percent of ill people were female. Of 33 ill people with information available, 31 hospitalizations were reported. Four deaths were reported from California (2), Hawaii, and New Jersey. Six cases were pregnancy-associated, with two resulting in fetal loss.

Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory evidence showed that enoki mushrooms supplied by Green Co. LTD, located in the Republic of Korea, were the likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the month before they became ill. Twelve out of 22 (55%) reported eating mushrooms, including enoki, portobello, white, button, cremini, wood ear, maitake, and oyster.

FDA and state officials collected enoki mushrooms for testing. The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development collected enoki mushrooms from a grocery store where an ill person shopped and identified the outbreak strain in two samples. These mushrooms were labeled as “Product of Korea” and were distributed by Sun Hong Foods, Inc. On March 9, 2020, Sun Hong Foods, Inc. recalled enoki mushrooms. The California Department of Public Health collected enoki mushrooms from grocery stores and identified the outbreak strain in one sample. These mushrooms were labeled as “Product of Korea” and were distributed by Guan’s Mushroom Co. On March 23, 2020, Guan’s Mushroom Co. recalled enoki mushrooms. FDA collected samples of enoki mushrooms for testing at import from Green Co. LTD of the Republic of Korea. On April 6, 2020, results showed that two samples yielded the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes. As a result, on April 7, 2020, FDA placed Green Co. LTD on Import Alert and H&C Foods Inc. recalled enoki mushrooms supplied by Green Co. LTD.

On March 18, 2020, the Korean Ministry of Food and Drug Safety published its investigation findings and steps it will take to prevent future illnesses. It found Listeria monocytogenes in enoki mushrooms produced by two firms in the Republic of Korea.

B&I Overseas Trading Inc from Van Nuys, CA is recalling frozen “Veladis herring in oil with Italian spices” because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled ” Veladis herring in oil with Italian spices” were sold at select International retail stores in the State of Washington. All affected product has been removed from sale. There was approximately 400 units sold in the months of November and December of 2020.

The product comes in a 17.64 ounce (500 gram) plastic package and is stamped on top portion of the package with expiration date of 08/08/2021 and is considered as lot number. UPC No.: 4823097903896

Tesoros Trading Co. from Las Vegas, NV is recalling certain codes of frozen “Trader Joe’s Lightly Salted Edamame” because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled “Trader Joe’s Lightly Salted Edamame” were sold at Trader Joe’s retail stores only in the Arizona, Southern California, Southern Nevada, and Utah regions. All affected product has been removed from sale and destroyed.

The product comes in a 16 ounce plastic package and is stamped on the back bottom portion of the package with lots:

22LA102 M
or
22LA102 N
or
22LA102 P

The company has removed the affected lots from distribution as the FDA and the company continue to investigate the source of the problem.

As of November 30, 2020, a total of 11 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes have been reported from three states.

Listeria samples from ill people were collected from August 6, 2020, to October 30, 2020. Ill people range in age from 40 to 89 years, with a median age of 84 years, and 82% are female. All 11 ill people were hospitalized. One death has been reported from Florida.

Epidemiologic evidence shows that deli meat is a likely source of this outbreak.

State and local public health officials interviewed ill people about the foods they ate in the month before they became ill. Of the 10 people interviewed, all reported eating Italian-style deli meats, such as salami, mortadella, and prosciutto. They reported purchasing prepackaged deli meats and meats sliced at deli counters at various locations.

Investigators are working to identify a specific type of deli meat or a common supplier linked to the illnesses.

Deli meats can have Listeria bacteria. Even when there are no ongoing outbreaks, people who are at higher risk of getting sick from Listeria should avoid eating deli meats, unless heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving.

Hy-Vee announced Tuesday they are voluntarily recalling two of its Hy-Vee Short Cuts vegetable mix products across its eight-state region including in Kansas and Missouri due to possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

“The potential for contamination was discovered during routine safety sampling at Hy-Vee’s Short Cuts production facility. To date, no illnesses have been reported in connection with these products. Listeria monocytogenes is defined as an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women,” Hy-Vee said in a release.

Hy-Vee is recalling Hy-Vee Short Cuts Pot Roast Mix – UPC Code 0272083305352, Hy-Vee Short Cuts Grill/Oven Ready Veggie Mix – UPC Code 0272104105992.

All affected products have a “Best if Used By” date of Dec. 3, 2020.

2 sick in New York, 7 sick in Massachusetts and 1 dead in Florida.

Late Friday, the CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) reported that they are investigating a multistate outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections.

As of October 22, 2020, a total of 10 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes have been reported from three states – New York, Massachusetts and Florida.

Listeria samples from ill people were collected from August 6, 2020, to October 3, 2020. Ill people range in age from 40 to 89 years, with a median age of 81 years. Eighty percent of ill people are female. All 10 ill people were hospitalized. One death has been reported from Florida.

Epidemiologic evidence shows that deli meat is a likely source of this outbreak.

State and local public health officials interviewed ill people about the foods they ate in the month before they became ill. Of the nine people interviewed, all reported eating Italian-style deli meats, such as salami, mortadella, and prosciutto. They reported purchasing prepackaged deli meats and meats sliced at deli counters at various locations.

Listeria bacteria can spread easily to other foods and surfaces. The bacteria in a contaminated deli product may spread to other deli meats and cheeses in shared display cases or equipment at deli counters.  A traceback investigation is ongoing to determine if there is a specific type of deli meat or a common supplier linked to illness.