As of November 15, 2022, two people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria have been reported from two states. Sick people’s samples were collected from October 5, 2022, to October 8, 2022.

The two sick people are 30 and 42 years old, and they are both males. Both have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.

Both sick people reported eating enoki mushrooms or eating at restaurants with menu items containing enoki mushrooms.

Public health investigators are using the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that may be part of this outbreak. CDC PulseNet manages a national database of DNA fingerprints of bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. DNA fingerprinting is performed on bacteria using a method called whole genome sequencing (WGS). WGS showed that bacteria from sick people’s samples are closely related genetically. This suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from the same food.

In November 2021, FDA found Listeria in one sample of enoki mushrooms that they collected at import, as part of the FDA’s strategy to prevent Listeria outbreaks linked to imported enoki mushrooms. These enoki mushrooms were destroyed. The Listeria from this sample is closely related genetically to the Listeria that made the people in this outbreak sick. However, to date, the firm associated with this sample has not been identified as a potential source of enoki mushrooms in this outbreak.

CDC advises people who are pregnant, aged 65 or older, or have a weakened immune system to not eat raw enoki mushrooms. CDC also advises restaurants to not serve raw enoki mushrooms. Cook enoki mushrooms thoroughly to kill any foodborne germs. Currently, FDA has issued three import alerts that include enoki mushrooms.

As of November 9, 2022, 16 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria have been reported from 6 states – California, Illinois, New York, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey.

Sick people’s samples were collected from April 17, 2021, to September 29, 2022. 

The true number of sick people in this outbreak is likely higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because some people recover without medical care and are not tested for Listeria. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Public health officials collect information about the age, ethnicity, and other demographics of sick people, and the types of foods they have eaten, to provide clues that can help identify the source of the outbreak. Sick people range in age from 38 to 92 years, with a median age of 74, and 62% are male. Of 13 people with ethnicity information available, 11 are of Eastern European background or speak Russian. Of 14 people with information available, 13 have been hospitalized. One person got sick during their pregnancy, resulting in pregnancy loss. Additionally, one death has been reported from Maryland.

State and local public health officials are interviewing people about the foods they ate in the month before they got sick. Of the 12 people interviewed, 11 reported eating meat or cheese from deli counters. Among seven sick people in New York, five bought sliced deli meat or cheese from at least one location of NetCost Market, a grocery store chain that sells international foods. Sick people from other states purchased deli meats or cheeses from other delis.

Investigators do not believe that NetCost Market delis are the only source of illnesses because some sick people in the outbreak did not shop at a NetCost Market. A contaminated food likely introduced the outbreak strain of Listeria into delis in multiple states.

Public health investigators are using the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that may be part of this outbreak. CDC PulseNet manages a national database of DNA fingerprints of bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. DNA fingerprinting is performed on bacteria using a method called whole genome sequencing (WGS).

WGS showed that bacteria from sick people’s samples are closely related genetically. This suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from the same food.

In 2021, health officials in New York state and New York City found the outbreak strain of Listeria in several environmental and food samples:
• Environmental samples from a NetCost Market deli in Brooklyn
• Several open packages of mortadella and ham that were sliced at the same NetCost Market deli in Brooklyn
• Sliced salami that a sick person bought from a NetCost Market deli in Staten Island

NetCost Market voluntarily closed the deli temporarily in Brooklyn after New York officials notified them about the sampling results. NetCost Market performed a deep cleaning and then reopened the deli in Brooklyn after further environmental testing did not identify Listeria.

In September 2022, the outbreak strain was found at the same Brooklyn NetCost Market deli; however, the most recent illness with NetCost Market exposure was in October 2021. After a deep cleaning, additional environmental testing did not identify Listeria in the deli.

Cut Fruit Express of Inver Grove Heights, MN is recalling Caribou Coffee Fruit and Cheese Plate 6.2oz because of potential contamination with Listeria Monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Caribou Coffee Fruit and Cheese Plate, item #3818, was distributed from Caribou Stores at the MSP Airport Caribou locations in the MSP Airport, Minnesota. The product comes in a clear plastic package. The USED BY DATES are 9/30/2022, 10/2/2022, 10/4/2022, 10/7/2022 and 10/9/2022.

Cut Fruit Express learned that their supplier is issuing a recall on Brie Cheese for potential contamination of Listeria Monocytogenes. Cut Fruit Express is initiating a recall on the affected product that contains the recalled Brie Cheese. The affected products were shipped between September 26th through October 5th, 2022.

Consumers should immediately DESTROY THE PRODUCT if they have it in their possession. 

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Magnolia Provision Company, Inc., a Knoxville, Tenn. establishment, is recalling approximately 497 pounds of beef jerky products that may be adulterated with Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ready-to-eat beef jerky items were produced on August 25, 2022. The following products are subject to recall:  

  • 2-oz. packages of “BEEF JERKY EXPERIENCE CHOP HOUSE STYLE PRIME RIB FLAVORED BEEF JERKY” with “EXP 8/25/23” displayed on the back of the package.
  • 8-oz. packages of “BEEF JERKY EXPERIENCE CHOP HOUSE STYLE PRIME RIB FLAVORED BEEF JERKY” with “EXP 8/25/23” displayed on the back of the package.
  • 16-oz. packages of “BEEF JERKY EXPERIENCE CHOP HOUSE STYLE PRIME RIB FLAVORED BEEF JERKY” with “EXP 8/25/23” displayed on the back of the package.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 8091” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered when the establishment reported to FSIS that it received confirmation from their third-party lab that a product contact surface sample returned as positive for Listeria monocytogenes.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.  

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) collected samples of ice cream and environmental samples from the ice cream production area at the Big Olaf Creamery facility in Sarasota, Florida. FDACS also performed whole genome sequencing on these samples and the Florida Department of Health identified the outbreak strain in the samples collected from the ice cream and the environment.

Outbreak update:

Total Illnesses: 25

Hospitalizations: 24

Death: 1

Fetal Loss: 1

States with Cases: Colorado (1), Florida (13), Georgia (1), Illinois (1), Kansas (1), Nebraska (1), Massachusetts  (2), Minnesota (1), New Jersey (1), New York (2), and Pennsylvania (1).

Product Distribution: FL, OH Distribution has been confirmed for states listed, but product could have been distributed further, reaching additional states.

The CDC and FDA report since the last update on July 13, 2022, two more illnesses have been reported. As of August 2, 2022, a total of 25 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes have been reported from 11 states. Thirteen sick people are residents of Florida and ten reported traveling to Florida before getting sick. Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 24, 2021, to June 24, 2022.

Sick people range in age from less than one to 92 years, with a median age of 72, and 56% are male. Of 25 people with information available, 24 have been hospitalized. One death in a person who was not pregnant has been reported from Illinois. Five people got sick during their pregnancy, and one person’s illness resulted in a fetal loss.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because some people recover without medical care and are not tested for Listeria. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Public health officials continue to interview people about the foods they ate before they got sick. Of the 21 people interviewed, all (100%) reported eating ice cream. Among 17 people who remembered details about the type of ice cream they ate, 12 reported eating Big Olaf Creamery brand ice cream or eating ice cream at locations that might have been supplied by Big Olaf Creamery. Eight sick people were identified as part of three illness clusters in this outbreak. An illness cluster is defined as two or more people who do not live in the same household who report eating food from the same retail location before getting sick. If several unrelated sick people ate food from the same retail location, it suggests that the contaminated food item was served or sold there. All three illness clusters were at retail locations that sell Big Olaf Creamery ice cream.

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The Florida Department of Health, CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several other states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are collecting different types of data to investigate a multistate outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections. As a result of this investigation, Big Olaf Creamery in Sarasota, FL, is voluntarily contacting retail locations to recommend against selling their ice cream products. Consumers who have Big Olaf Creamery brand ice cream at home should throw away any remaining product.

Public health officials continue to interview people about the foods they ate in the month before they got sick. Of the 17 people interviewed, 14 (82%) reported eating ice cream. Among 13 people who remembered details about the type of ice cream they ate, six reported eating Big Olaf Creamery brand ice cream or eating ice cream at locations that might have been supplied by Big Olaf Creamery.

On July 1, 2022, Big Olaf Creamery in Sarasota, FL, voluntarily began contacting retail locations to recommend against selling their ice cream products. Consumers who have Big Olaf Creamery brand ice cream at home should throw away any remaining product.

Public health officials continue to interview people about the foods they ate in the month before they got sick. Of the 17 people interviewed, 14 (82%) reported eating ice cream. Among 13 people who remembered details about the type of ice cream they ate, six reported eating Big Olaf Creamery brand ice cream or eating ice cream at locations that might have been supplied by Big Olaf Creamery.

As of June 29, 2022, a total of 23 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes have been reported from 10 states. Of the 22 people with information, 20 sick people reported living in or traveling to Florida in the month before they got sick, although the significance of this is still under investigation. Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 24, 2021, through June 12, 2022.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 to 92 years, with a median age of 72, and 52% are male. Twenty-two people (96%) have been hospitalized. Five people got sick during their pregnancy, and one illness resulted in a fetal loss. One death has been reported from Illinois.

Two residents in a retirement home in Ottawa, Canada, have died from listeria poisoning. The deaths are part of a month-long outbreak at the resident home.

Ottawa Public Health (OPH) says officials are investigating the outbreak at City View Retirement Community in Nepean. As of the last update on Tuesday, there were four confirmed cases among residents of the home, including the two people who have died. 

High-risk foods, including deli meats, were removed from the home’s menu as of May 4, according to OPH.

OPH has conducted 10 site visits to the facility over the past month including multiple food safety compliance inspections and follow-up inspections, and at least one hazard analysis critical control point audit. None of the food tested by OPH has come back positive for listeria.

The investigation is supported by Public Health Ontario, as well as its laboratories, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. 

OPH has submitted food samples and environmental swab samples to the provincial lab, which needs about one week to provide preliminary results and an additional week to provide final results.

Eight people in Denmark have been infected with Listeria in the space of two weeks and three have died.

The Statens Serum Institut, Danish Veterinary and Food Administration (Fødevarestyrelsen) and DTU Food Institute are investigating to try and find the source of the outbreak.

Five men and three women became infected with the same type of Listeria between May 13 and 29, this year.

Patients range from 33 to 93 years old and all of them had an underlying disease or other immune system issue prior to infection that made them particularly vulnerable. Two had meningitis, five had sepsis, including a pregnant woman, and one had a cerebral abscess.

All eight have been hospitalized and three people died within 30 days of the sample being taken. Seven of them are from the Hovedstaden region of the country.

Paris Brothers, Inc., of Kansas City, Missouri is recalling several specific cheese products listed below because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The following cheeses produced on May 4, 5, and 6, 2022 are the only products in the recall. Shipping cartons with the affected product will bear the lot codes of 05042022, 05052022, or 05062022. Individual retail outlets may have relabeled the individual consumer packages.

• Cottonwood River Cheddar
• D’amir Brie Double Crème French Brie
• Milton Prairie Breeze White Cheddar Style
• Milton Tomato Garlic Cheddar
• Paris Brothers Mild Cheddar
• Paris Brothers Colby Jack
• Paris Brothers Pepper Jack
• Cervasi Pecorino Romano

The products were delivered to wholesalers for distribution in grocery stores in KS, MO, AR, IA, OK, NE, SD, one store in MS, and one store in FL.

This recall is the result of routine sampling by the FDA, which revealed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes.

A total of 18 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes were reported from 13 states – Idaho 1, Iowa 2, Maryland 1, Michigan 1, Minnesota 2, Nevada 1, North Carolina 1, Ohio 3, Oregon 1, Pennsylvania 1, Texas 2, Utah 1, and Wisconsin 1. The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not have been limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because some people recover without medical care and are not tested for Listeria.

Sick people ranged in age from 50 to 94 years, with a median age of 76, and 83% were female. Of 16 people with information available, all were hospitalized. Three deaths were reported, one each from Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

Whole genome sequencing (WGS) showed that bacteria from sick people’s samples were closely related genetically. This suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from the same food.

In October 2021, before the most recent CDC investigation began, the Georgia Department of Agriculture identified Listeria in a Dole brand garden salad as part of a routine sampling program of food at grocery stores. WGS later showed that the Listeria in the garden salad was the outbreak strain. The garden salad was produced at Dole’s Bessemer City, North Carolina, facility.

After CDC reopened this outbreak investigation, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development collected samples of packaged salads from retail stores for testing and identified the outbreak strain of Listeria in a Marketside brand package of shredded iceberg lettuce. The shredded iceberg lettuce was produced at Dole’s Yuma, Arizona, facility.

Dole conducted a root cause analysis and collected samples from their facilities and equipment for testing. Dole found Listeria on equipment used to harvest iceberg lettuce. FDA conducted WGS and found that the Listeria on the equipment was the outbreak strain.

Dole’s continued investigation found the outbreak strain on a piece of equipment in their Yuma facility and in packaged salads on hold that were included in the initial recall.

On December 22, 2021, Dole recalled all Dole-branded and private label packaged salads processed at their Bessemer City, North Carolina, and Yuma, Arizona, facilities.

On January 7, 2022, Dole recalled additional products containing iceberg lettuce harvested by the contaminated harvesting equipment.

WiseTrade Corporation of Irvine, California is recalling all its cases of its 200g/7.05oz packages of ENOKI MUSHROOM (Product of Korea) because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled Enoki Mushroom product was distributed in CA to produce distributors or wholesalers for further distribution to retail stores.

The Enoki Mushroom comes in a 200g/7.05oz clear plastic package with the following description “Global Fresh Marketing Enoki Mushrooms” in the front and back Wisetrade Coporation Irvine, CA 92618.

The UPC is 809728-95012 on the back side of the package.

There is no lot code or dates on a package.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem. The distribution of the product has been suspended.

The potential for contamination was discovered after a retail sample collected and analyzed by California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and revealed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in 7.05 oz. package of Enoki mushroom.