The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is advising consumers not to consume Wilcox Ice Cream (“best by” dates 9/13/24, 9/14/24, 9/15/24), produced by Wilcox Ice Cream in East Arlington, Vermont, as it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes bacteria. 

The company is voluntarily recalling the following products:

FlavorPackage Size
Wilcox’s Premium Sweet Cream1.5 QuartQuartPint
Wilcox’s Premium Sweet Cream Caramel Apple       1.5 QuartQuartPint
Wilcox’s Premium Vanilla1.5 QuartQuartPint
Wilcox’s Premium Salted Caramel Turtle1.5 QuartQuartPint
Wilcox’s Premium Maple Cream1.5 QuartQuartPint
Wilcox’s Premium Mint Chocolate Chip1.5 QuartQuartPint
Leonardo’s Gelato Mint Chocolate Chip4 oz. cups  
Wilcox’s SUPER PREMIUM Mint Chocolate Chip1.5 Quart Pint
Wilcox’s SUPER PREMIUM Caramel Brownie 1.5 Quart Pint

Consumers should discontinue consumption of the product immediately. Please dispose of this product or return to your store of purchase for full credit.  

“Listeriosis can cause serious health concerns,” said Patricia Tilley, Director of the DHHS Division of Public Health Services (DPHS). “Foods that are contaminated may not look, smell, or taste any different so there is no way to tell if Listeriosis is present. The Division of Public Health Services is recommending that consumers, restaurants, and retailers check their freezers and throw away recalled ice cream products or return to the place of purchase for a full refund.”

The recall was initiated after a sample tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes by the DPHS Public Health Laboratory. No illnesses have been reported to date. Wilcox Ice Cream is sold at food establishments in New England including the Hanover Co-Op Food Store, Lebanon Co-Op Food Store and the Monadnock Food Co-Op in New Hampshire. DHHS will provide updates if additional New Hampshire distribution locations are identified. Wilcox Ice Cream is cooperating with state officials to determine the root cause of the contamination. 

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections, especially in young children, frail or elderly people, pregnant women, and others with weakened immune systems.

Symptoms of listeriosis include fever, muscle aches, and sometimes nausea and vomiting. The bacteria can also spread from the gut to other parts of the body and cause serious and invasive infection, including the nervous system leading to symptoms such as headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, or convulsions. Listeriosis can be treated with antibiotics, so anyone who suspects they may have the illness should contact their healthcare provider.

Two people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria were reported from two states: one from New York and one from Pennsylvania. Sick people’s samples were collected in May and June 2023. Both sick people were hospitalized, and neither died.

The true number of sick people in this outbreak is likely higher than the number reported, and this outbreak may not have been limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because some people recover without medical care and are not tested for Listeria.

One sick person ate “Soft Serve on The Go” ice cream cups, and the other person likely ate the same ice cream cup at a long-term care facility they lived.

The outbreak strain of Listeria was found in “Soft Serve On The Go” ice cream cups, “Ice Cream House” mini dessert cigar novelty ice cream, and several environmental samples taken from two of The Ice Cream House stores.

“Ice Cream House” products and “Soft Serve On The Go” ice cream cups were made by The Ice Cream House of Brooklyn, NY.

“Ice Cream House” products were sold at Ice Cream House store locations in Brooklyn, NY, and at grocery stores in New Jersey, New York, and Ohio.

“Soft Serve On The Go” ice cream cups were sold nationwide and also distributed to long-term care facilities and nursing homes.

“Ice Cream House” ice cream and frozen dessert products and “Soft Serve On The Go” ice cream cups were recalled in August and September. 

Recalled products do not have a lot code on the label.

Don Miguel Foods, a Dallas, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 10,642 pounds of frozen ready-to-eat (RTE) carne asada burrito products that may be adulterated with Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The frozen RTE carne asada burrito items were produced on September 27, 2023. The following products are subject to recall [view labels]:

  • 7-oz. individual wax paper packages containing “DON MIGUEL Hand Made BURRITO CARNE ASADA” with date code D23270 printed on the package.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 20049” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail convenience store locations nationwide.                            

The problem was discovered after the establishment’s laboratory testing indicated the product may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. The establishment notified FSIS that some of the affected product was distributed into commerce.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.  

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

NORTH CHARLESTON, SC – September 19, 2023 – Life Raft Treats is expanding their recall of their Not Fried Chicken 64 oz bucket, Not Fried Chicken 2.5 oz bar UPC 8 60006 18210 6 and Life Is Peachy 6 count box ice cream products, to include the BEST BY DATES up to and including AUG 08282024 due to a potential contamination of Listeria monocytogenesListeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, a Listeria monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

On September 18, 2023, the firm was notified by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) that they needed to include an additional lot of their Not Fried Chicken ice cream treat which also test positive for Listeria monocytogenes. The firm also decided to recall their Life Is Peachy Ice Cream treats because both products were manufactured in the same room.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

Products affected are:

ProductProductUPCUse By Dates
LIFE RAFT TREATS
LIFE IS PEACHY
6 COUNTNO UPC CODEUp to and
including
BEST BY
AUG 08282024
LIFE RAFT TREATS
NOT FRIED CHICKEN
ICE CREAM
64 OZ BUCKETNO UPC CODEUp to and
including
BEST BY
AUG 08282024
LIFE RAFT TREATS
NOT FRIED CHICKEN
ICE CREAM
2.5 OZ BAR8 60006 18210 6Up to and
including
BEST BY
AUG 08282024

The recalling firm began shipping recalled products on 8/28/2023. These products were packaged in laminated buckets and plastic wrap and shipped via www.Goldbelly.comExternal Link Disclaimeronline directly to consumers located in AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, MI, MS, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, PA, SC, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA & WI.

According to the Washington State Department of Health, six Washington residents (five from Pierce County and one from Thurston County) developed severe illness due to infection with Listeria bacteria (listeriosis). Three of the individuals died. Genetic fingerprinting (whole genome sequencing) of the bacteria indicated that the same food was likely responsible for making all six people sick.

Two of the people infected with listeriosis reported consuming milkshakes from Frugals restaurant at 10727 Pacific Ave. S., Tacoma, WA, 98444 prior to becoming sick. Because milkshakes and ice cream have caused listeria outbreaks in the past, the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department collected milkshake samples from the restaurant on August 8, 2023. On August 18, 2023, all flavors of the milkshakes were found to be contaminated with the same strain of Listeria that caused the outbreak.

The restaurant discontinued use of its two milkshake machines on August 8. The milkshake machines will be kept out of service until the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department determines they are free of Listeria contamination and no longer pose a danger to the public.

Tacoma-Pierce County Department of Health reports that it is working with Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and Thurston County Public Health and Social Services to investigate 5 cases of the foodborne illness listeriosis in Western Washington. 

Four of the cases are in Pierce County. One is in Thurston County. All 5 patients were hospitalized and 3 died. All the cases were in patients with weakened immune systems in their 60s or 70s.

Genetic fingerprinting results (whole genome sequencing) indicate that these patients likely have the same source of infection. Patients became ill between February 27 and June 30, 2023.

Investigators are interviewing patients or their proxies to help identify any common exposures.

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated a multistate outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections. Epidemiologic data showed that leafy greens were a likely source of the outbreak. However, there was not enough other data to identify a specific type or producer of leafy greens.

As of June 13, 2023, a total of 19 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria were reported from 16 states. Sick people’s samples were collected from July 3, 2018, to March 31, 2023.

Public health officials collected many different types of information from sick people, including their age, race, ethnicity, other demographics, and the foods they ate in the month before they got sick. This information provided clues to help investigators identify the source of the outbreak.

Sick people ranged in age from less than 1 to 96 years, with a median age of 72, and 63% were female. Among 19 people with race information available, 17 people were White, 1 was African American/Black, and 1 reported “Other” race. Among 19 people with ethnicity information available, two people were Hispanic. Eighteen people were hospitalized, and no deaths were reported.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the month before they got sick. Of 14 people who answered questions about leafy greens, 13 (93%) people ate leafy greens, 13 (93%) ate iceberg lettuce, and 10 (71%) ate romaine lettuce. Twelve (86%) people ate packaged salads. CDC conducted a case-case analysis, comparing foods that sick people in this outbreak reported eating to foods that people sick with Listeria reported eating who were not part of an outbreak. The analysis showed that people in this outbreak were 8 times more likely to eat iceberg lettuce (p=0.035), 5 times more likely to eat romaine lettuce (p=0.038), and 4 times more likely to eat packaged salads (p=0.049) than sick people not in this outbreak. This suggests that leafy greens were a likely source of this outbreak. Three people ate leafy greens at the long-term care facilities they lived in, and one person ate leafy greens at a hospital they worked in. People bought leafy greens and different brands of packaged salads from several stores.

Public health investigators used the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that were part of this outbreak. CDC PulseNet manages a national database of DNA fingerprints of bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. DNA fingerprinting is performed on bacteria using a method called whole genome sequencing (WGS). WGS showed that bacteria from sick people’s samples were closely related genetically. This suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from the same food.

As of April 20, 2023, a total of 18 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria have been reported from 15 states – Arkansas 1, California 1, Colorado 1, Illinois 1, Louisiana 1, Michigan 2, Missouri 1, Nebraska 1, New York 1, North Carolina 2, Pennsylvania 1, South Dakota 1, Texas 1, Washington 1 and Wisconsin 2.

Sick people’s samples were collected from July 3, 2018, to March 31, 2023.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 to 96 years, with a median age of 73, and 61% are female. Race or ethnicity information is available for 18 sick people. Two sick people reported Hispanic ethnicity. Of 16 people that did not report Hispanic ethnicity, 15 are White and one is African American/Black. Of 18 people with information available, 17 have been hospitalized. There is one pregnancy-associated illness in a newborn.

Clio Snacks of Piscataway, N.J. is voluntarily recalling 581 cases of its Strawberry Granola & Greek Yogurt Parfait Bar due to potential contamination with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Product was distributed to select Walmart stores between 3/5/2023 and 3/8/2023.

The impacted product comes in a single-serving box with UPC Code 854021008152, Lot Number 048C2023 and an expiration date of 4/30/2023 stamped on the side of the box.

Strawberry Granola & Greek Yogurt Parfait Bar is the only product impacted. No other products are being recalled.

This potential limited exposure was found at a third-party manufacturer’s facility where Parfait Bars are produced. The third-party manufacturer does not manufacture any other Clio products. Clio does not manufacture Parfait bars at its own facility.

The recall was the result of a routine testing program by the company which revealed that affected Strawberry Parfait product produced by Clio’s contract manufacturer may contain Listeria monocytogenes. The third-party manufacturer has ceased production and Clio has ceased distribution of the affected product while the FDA and the company continue their investigation into what caused the problem.

Consumers who have purchased Clio Strawberry Granola & Yogurt Parfait bar with an expiration date of 4/30/2023 should not consume the product.

As of November 15, 2022, two people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria have been reported from two states. Sick people’s samples were collected from October 5, 2022, to October 8, 2022.

The two sick people are 30 and 42 years old, and they are both males. Both have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.

Both sick people reported eating enoki mushrooms or eating at restaurants with menu items containing enoki mushrooms.

Public health investigators are using the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that may be part of this outbreak. CDC PulseNet manages a national database of DNA fingerprints of bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. DNA fingerprinting is performed on bacteria using a method called whole genome sequencing (WGS). WGS showed that bacteria from sick people’s samples are closely related genetically. This suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from the same food.

In November 2021, FDA found Listeria in one sample of enoki mushrooms that they collected at import, as part of the FDA’s strategy to prevent Listeria outbreaks linked to imported enoki mushrooms. These enoki mushrooms were destroyed. The Listeria from this sample is closely related genetically to the Listeria that made the people in this outbreak sick. However, to date, the firm associated with this sample has not been identified as a potential source of enoki mushrooms in this outbreak.

CDC advises people who are pregnant, aged 65 or older, or have a weakened immune system to not eat raw enoki mushrooms. CDC also advises restaurants to not serve raw enoki mushrooms. Cook enoki mushrooms thoroughly to kill any foodborne germs. Currently, FDA has issued three import alerts that include enoki mushrooms.